Fort Wayne Realty Blog

8505 Bremen Way VIDEO TOUR

January 28th, 2015

Nice 3 Bed 2 bath ranch on the north side of town off of Wallen Road. Open floor plan with lots of possibilities. Seller is offering a $2000 appliance allowance for the kitchen. Nice cathedral ceiling in the living room and a fireplace. There is also a nice den/office off of the foyer. Landscaping was just redone. Very room master bedroom and closet. This is a great value for this subdivision. Make your appt. today.

At North Eastern Group Realty, we are prepared to assist our clients with their significant Fort Wayne real estate decisions. Our corporate commitment is to provide real knowledge, proven experience and professional, quality service. To search all Fort Wayne homes for sale or find a Fort Wayne REALTOR®, visit our website at NorthEasternGroup.com.

North Eastern Group Realty is Fort Wayne’s largest independent real estate company located at 10808 La Cabreah Lane, Fort Wayne, IN 46845.

1517 Thorny Meadow Lane VIDEO TOUR

January 27th, 2015

Looking for an AWESOME home? You’ve founding it… Come see this Beautiful custom built one owner Sprawling – Vaulted – Ranch style home. 400 Square foot Great room features attractive showcase fireplace flanked by tall sunny windows. Our custom kitchen has an abundance of custom craftsman built, Harlan Cherry wood cabinets topped off with newer seamless counter tops. Upgraded side by side refrigerator, microwave, ceramic top range and dishwasher all remain with this well decorated home. Breakfast bar. You’ll love this large dinning room with space for a large gathering. Ceramic floors provide durable wear adding a crisp look throughout kitchen, dinning room, laundry room and two full bath rooms. The owner added the custom sunroom to the home a few years ago. Which features soaring vaulted ceiling. It also, offers heat and central air. From this area step out onto the huge patio where you may grill all your favorite foods or relax until your hearts content. There’s more! Three spacious bedrooms provide the perfect private retreat for your family. WOW! Owners suite has it all, double sinks, 6 foot vanity, jet tub for 2, easy step in shower and walk-in closet. Cable jacks in multiple locations throughout the home. The oversized 2.5 car garage has added storage space in the overhead attic. Never run low on hot water, with Two gas water heaters. Gas forced air heat and central air conditioning, too. You will be proud to call this your home. The well manicured lawn has been professionally landscaped for your viewing pleasure. Clean, lovely, ready to move in and ENJOY! This is truly a RARE must see property. Located Just off Auburn Road in Becketts Run. Conveniently located near the new Parkview Hospital, shopping malls, great restaurants, wonderful schools and moments from I-69 & I-469. OPURTUNITY IS KNOCKING… CALL TODAY, FOR YOUR PERSONAL TOUR.

At North Eastern Group Realty, we are prepared to assist our clients with their significant Fort Wayne real estate decisions. Our corporate commitment is to provide real knowledge, proven experience and professional, quality service. To search all Fort Wayne homes for sale or find a Fort Wayne REALTOR®, visit our website at NorthEasternGroup.com.

North Eastern Group Realty is Fort Wayne’s largest independent real estate company located at 10808 La Cabreah Lane, Fort Wayne, IN 46845.

Housing Ideas: The Shed Roof

January 27th, 2015

There are few architectural elements in a home that suggest “traditional” or “contemporary” as strongly as roof shape. Ask a child to draw a house and you’re likely to get a box capped with the classic gabled roof. So too the flat roof and its association with contemporary architecture. The shed, or single-slope, roof lies between. Neither entirely contemporary nor completely traditional, it brings to mind images of the woodshed or toolshed — classically informed, but contemporary in its utility.

For an architect, the selection and design of a roof form has less to do with signifying modern or traditional and more to do with determining what that roof can do for the interior space, how it can actively respond to the local climate and site conditions, and the specific requirements of the homeowner. The shed roof happens to be a particularly adaptable solution — and here’s why.

Structural Simplicity

Shed roof forms are inherently simple from a structural standpoint. The roof loads are transferred to the exterior walls, which either act as load-bearing walls or, as in this example, are supported by simple beams and columns. Depending on the interior room shape desired, the shed roof can transfer these loads to the bearing points using trusses, a combination of beams and purlins, or simple roof rafters spanning from eave to eave.

Each variation offers more or less interior detail. A series of regularly spaced rafters (spaced roughly 24 inches apart on center) across the ceiling here displays the structural logic and lends a richly textured cap to the room. It’s also great for a room’s acoustics.

Here the architect has hidden the structural framing to create a clean, minimalistic aesthetic that helps to maximize the amount of reflected light.

Choosing whether to express the structure inside has an impact on the insulation too. In this example the depth of the framing members can be filled with insulation, and it’s concealed by the ceiling finish. Exposed framing requires the insulation to be placed above the plane of the interior ceiling, resulting in a thicker roof build-up.

Site Responsive

When architects talk about a building being site responsive, we mean that its shape and layout are informed by the particulars of a given place. Depending on the site, that can mean many different things. A sloping topography, distant views, a significant boulder or tree, the climate and solar exposure are all things to which we can respond, and the shed roof offers unique opportunities for each.

Topography. Mirroring the surrounding topography with the roof form, as this project does, reduces the scale and visual impact of a home on the site. It fits an overall idea about fitting a home to a place.

Using the roof form to oppose the slope distinguishes the building form and opens up different spatial opportunities. Here it’s used to insert two full floor levels on the downhill side.

Passive solar. The shed shape is an efficient means of addressing a given latitude’s solar concerns. In northern climates, positioning the low eave of the shed toward the north minimizes the building’s surface area and heat loss on a cold exposure. The tall wall — the shed’s peak — would face south to collect the sun and passively heat the space.

In hot climates the shed can be oriented to minimize heat gain from southern and western exposures while still permitting plenty of indirect daylight.

With large amounts of south-facing glass, special care must be taken to prevent overheating. This is true for all climates, as these windows can introduce great quantities of heat into a home year-round.

Adding louvered slats to the exterior, as in this project, can thoughtfully modulate the heat gain. The slats here are designed for a specific latitude to cut off the high angle of the summer sun and admit the low angle of the winter sun.

Using an interior light shelf with a shed roof is an excellent means of controlling both daylight and heat gain. The shelf helps to diminish the scale of the tall exterior wall and provides a comfortable frame of reference near eye level inside.

Overhangs are another passive design element that can help keep the heat from reaching the interior. They can be sized to shield direct heat gain during the hottest parts of the day while allowing light in and views out. This large overhang with expressed framing is a thoroughly modern, honest and functional aesthetic.

Daylighting (clerestories). With its raised peak, the clerestory window band is one of the most common types of glazing used with shed roofs. They make passive solar heating and daylighting strategies possible.

With floor-to-ceiling glass, the roof appears to hover and the entire room seems to be a part of the outdoors. The more daylight we can capture, the less we have to rely on artificial lighting sources.

Weather protection. While we can design any roof to adequately keep out the weather, the shed has a few benefits that other shapes don’t. The wedge shape has a clear front and back side that can be used to buffer prevailing wind patterns, and to direct water and snow away from walkways, entry points and gathering places. In this way the roof form delivers on its name, shedding the undesirable elements from the places we use most often.

The depth of the roof overhang affects just how much weather the nearby interior spaces are subject to as well. Deep overhangs can help mitigate the risk of water infiltration, especially at the more vulnerable large glazed areas we see in many of these examples.

Rainwater harvesting. While the roof protects, it can also provide. It can efficiently gather rainwater and direct it to a single point of collection to be used for irrigation, or can simply channel it away from the building’s foundation.

Directional (views). The form of the roof as viewed from inside naturally directs our eyes up and outward. Here the roof is used as a dynamic directional element, focusing us toward a spectacular view. Contrast this with gabled and flat roofs, which are inherently more static and inward looking.

At North Eastern Group Realty, we are prepared to assist our clients with their significant Fort Wayne real estate decisions. Our corporate commitment is to provide real knowledge, proven experience and professional, quality service. To search all Fort Wayne homes for sale or find a Fort Wayne REALTOR®, visit our website at NorthEasternGroup.com.

North Eastern Group Realty is Fort Wayne’s largest independent real estate company located at 10808 La Cabreah Lane, Fort Wayne, IN 46845.

Home Tip: How Frost Damage Happens, and When and How to Prune.

January 22nd, 2015

Freezing temperatures can cause brown, crispy growth on plants that are susceptible to frost damage. Frost damage can occur when temperatures dip to or below the freezing point, 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius). And both cold-hardy plants and tenderer plants that do best in warmer temperatures can, depending on the circumstances, be affected by frost damage.

Growth damaged by frost can look ugly, and your first impulse may be to prune it — but don’t. Believe it or not, you can do more damage if you remove the damaged growth too soon. In fact, those ugly brown leaves actually help to protect the interior of the plant from future freezes. So, let’s dive into frost damage — how it affects our plants and, more important, how and when to prune frost-damaged growth.

Frosts and freezes. Before we talk about the damage that freezing weather can cause to plants, let’s talk about what frosts and freezes are and the damage they both can cause, which is called frost damage.

Frosts occur on clear nights when the temperature dips to 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius) or even a few degrees above. At these temperatures water vapor freezes on the surface of plants, creating a frosted appearance. Unless you have a garden filled with tropical plants, most plants can handle a light frost with little to no damage.

Freezes happen when very cold weather arrives and the temperature dips below 32 degrees and even into the 20s (negative Celsius) and below. Damage to plants from freezes is more severe than that from frost and can cause significant injury to plants.

How do freezing temperatures damage susceptible plants? When the outside air temperature hits 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius) or below, it causes the water both inside and outside plant cells to freeze. The ice within the plant punctures the plant’s cells, which causes the death of that part of the plant.

What are the signs of damage? The sudden wilting of the outer growth is the first sign your plants have suffered frost damage — leaves are usually affected first. This happens because the plant’s cells have been punctured and their contents have leaked out. The next sign of frost damage is when the wilted growth begins to turn brown and crispy or even black, which indicates that that part of the plant has died.

Cold-temperature injury to plants is first seen on the outer growth, while the undergrowth may still remain green. However, more severe frost damage can affect the entire plant and cause most, if not all, of the above ground growth to die.

What types of plants are affected by frost damage? Different types of plants are susceptible to frost damage. Tender plants, such as tropical plants, are one type. These plants do not tolerate freezing temperatures and can suffer significant damage, or even death, when the temperature goes to 32 degrees Fahrenheit or below. Semitropical plants, such as bougainvillea, lantana and yellow bells (Tecoma stans var. stans and Tecoma stans var. angustata, zone 8), can survive temperatures below freezing, often into the 20s, but will suffer significant frost damage and will need to be pruned.

Plants that have not hardened off before freezing temperatures arrive can also suffer frost damage. Hardening off is the process by which plants gradually acclimate to temperature changes over time. Unseasonable freezes, like after plants have emerged from dormancy in late spring, that arrive before the plants have had a chance to adapt to cold temperatures, can damage even cold-hardy plants that can normally handle subzero winter temperatures.

When to prune. While frost-damaged growth can protect the lower parts of your plants, the good news is that you don’t have to keep it around forever. After the average last frost date for your area has passed is the earliest time to prune frost-damaged plants. (Check The Old Farmer’s Almanac to see when your average last frost date is.)

You may cause the death of your plant if you prune too early and more freezing weather arrives. Because pruning stimulates new growth, any freezing weather that occurs afterward can cause significant damage to the new growth, which is extremely susceptible to injury from freezing temperatures, and to the plant itself.

At North Eastern Group Realty, we are prepared to assist our clients with their significant Fort Wayne real estate decisions. Our corporate commitment is to provide real knowledge, proven experience and professional, quality service. To search all Fort Wayne homes for sale or find a Fort Wayne REALTOR®, visit our website at NorthEasternGroup.com.

North Eastern Group Realty is Fort Wayne’s largest independent real estate company located at 10808 La Cabreah Lane, Fort Wayne, IN 46845.